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Category Archive for '1930s'

In the 1930s increasing speed and a larger number of vehicles meant road authorities began focusing on the cause of traffic accidents. During this early period of crash investigation police usually took only one or two photographs, often not at the location where the accident occurred. In these early examples its impossible to speculate on […]

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directing traffic

Sydney’s streets changed as a result of the increased motor traffic. Subsequent law reforms were made to better manage flow and congestion, also leading to driver and road safety education programs. The archive reveals these changes by showing how the roads looked before any traffic lights, road markings or street signs were installed. The Police […]

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The Archive Gallery has been transformed for the archive’s latest offering Collision: misadventure by motor car. This exhibition presents previously unseen traffic accident photographs taken by police between 1920 and 1964. Recent research on the archive reveals that after the mid-1940s the police approach to photographing accident sites becomes more comprehensive – expanding from one […]

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Jean

Jean McDonald was a fraudster and confidence trickster. She looks drab and resentful here but her sob stories were ambitious, florid and well-told. Through 1923-24 she methodically extracted money and favours from a gullible Randwick benefactress with tales of heroic war service, sick children and missing husbands. When she needed to up the narrative ante […]

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Recently I strapped on my walking boots and joined the Justice and Police Museum guides for Walk the razor’s edge. The walking tour begins on Oxford Street and snakes through Darlinghurst visiting the haunts associated with underworld vice and crime. Much of the terraced landscape remains unaltered from the 1920s and 30s when it served […]

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