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Category Archive for '1920s'

Blood on the streets

Razorhurst, Gunhurst, Bottlehurst, Dopehurst – it used to be Darlinghurst, one of the finest quarters of a rich and beautiful city; to-day it is a plague-spot, where the sporn of the gutter grow and fatten on official apathy. By day it shelters in its alleys, in its dens, the Underworld people. At night, it looses […]

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This quirky photograph has been inscribed with the words “Traffic signals vehicle or car 472”. In 1921 the need to regulate traffic saw the introduction of hand signals for motorists when stopping or turning. By 1924 the use of these hand signals had became compulsory. Presumably police used this image for demonstrations or when instructing […]

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James Morton will give a fascinating talk at the Justice and Police Museum this Saturday, March 26, from 2 pm. Picking up where Crooks like us left off, Morton reveals the antics of some of Australia’s greatest criminal exports as they worked their trade in England and Europe. Morton met author Peter Doyle at the […]

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The Archive Gallery has been transformed for the archive’s latest offering Collision: misadventure by motor car. This exhibition presents previously unseen traffic accident photographs taken by police between 1920 and 1964. Recent research on the archive reveals that after the mid-1940s the police approach to photographing accident sites becomes more comprehensive – expanding from one […]

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Tilly Devine stares out from this image taken upon her entry to gaol. She was an incredibly successful villain who, along with her nemesis Kate Leigh, ruled the inner city vice trade for almost 20 years. Tilly began her criminal career as a teenage prostitute on the streets of London. She toughened up quickly in […]

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