Commemorative crafts

Tea cosy embroidered with the Rising Sun badge, from Rouse Hill House and Farm.

Tea cosy embroidered with the Rising Sun badge. Sydney Living Museums R87/103

This handsome handmade tea cosy was made from a black silk skirt panel that belonged to Bessie Rouse (b.1843, d.1924). The cosy, and remarkably, the remnants of the skirt, complete with tea-cosy-shaped hole in it, remain in the Rouse Hill House and Farm collection. The  tea cosy is an example of commemorative craft from the first World War period. It honours the 54th battalion which was active in Egypt and France between 1916 and 1918 and depicts the official design of the Rising Sun emblem that was used between 1904 – 1949.

The other commemorative craft that survives today is of course, the Anzac biscuit.  Continue reading

Shattered remains

Reconstructed bottle fragments found at Rouse Hill House.

Reconstructed bottle fragments found at Rouse Hill House and Farm. Photo Scott Hill © Sydney Living Museums

The history of Rouse Hill House and Farm is recorded in many ways: in text, in photographs, in the landscape, structures and their contents – and in the archaeological remains that dot the site. These humble glass fragments evoke the site’s earliest European occupancy. Continue reading

A treasure trove of cookery books

Emma Rouse's Beeton's book of household management

Emma Rouse's Beeton's book of household management, 1863. Photo Jacqui Newling © Sydney Living Museums R89/79

Through most of the nineteenth century, Rouse Hill House was the social hub of the district and the Rouse family regularly played host to formal society dinners, long luncheons and sociable tea parties, plus major family events to celebrate birthdays, weddings and Christmas. Continue reading